The 2 Essential Online Channels Physicians Can Use for Public Health Education and Advocacy

By Christopher Oseh
October 6, 2020

During the global lockdown period of the Coronavirus pandemic, I woke up on a Saturday morning to see this direct message on my Facebook messenger:

 “Hi Doc, please how do I know if I have contracted the Covid-19 virus”.

It was from one of my friends who had become anxious after reading false information online about the COVID-19 virus. She quickly reached out to me with this question because she knew I was active on Facebook. Continue reading “The 2 Essential Online Channels Physicians Can Use for Public Health Education and Advocacy”

Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice

A Webinar Series Offering Clinical Perspectives on Racial and Social Justice Issues

It’s no secret that racial and social disparities continue to affect the health of our communities across the United States. With increased attention resulting from the high-profile deaths of African Americans at the hands of law enforcement and the growing inequities stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, this weekly Harvard Medical School web series, Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice seeks to explore how race and racism affect the health of our communities. Continue reading “Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice”

Prescribing Size-Inclusive Home Fitness Routines in the Era of COVID-19

By Jamie Marchetti, MS, RDN, LD
September 17, 2020

In the time of COVID-19, routines have changed drastically and frequently. This has impacted many areas of the lives of Americans, including fitness routines. Gyms, if open, often have restrictions. So how can you best support your patients who need physical exercise? Continue reading “Prescribing Size-Inclusive Home Fitness Routines in the Era of COVID-19”

I Don’t Feel like a Hero: Imposter Syndrome and Perfectionism During a Pandemic

By Gail Gazelle, MD, MCC 
June 25, 2020

When Jeff left his ED shift at a New York City hospital in mid-April, he felt like anything but a hero. He’d intubated three COVID-19 patients: a 63-year-old businessman, an 82-year-old woman who reminded him of his grandmother, and a 45-year-old mother of two teens. The elderly woman and the businessman were transferred to the ICU. The mother of two teens was not; she expired in the ED.

By the end of his shift, Jeff felt a crushing weight of sadness and anguish unlike anything he’d experienced in his 15 years as an emergency physician—this shift was now his new norm. Continue reading “I Don’t Feel like a Hero: Imposter Syndrome and Perfectionism During a Pandemic”

Confronting COVID-19 and Social Media: A Hospitalist Speaks Out On Re-Opening

By Melissa Bartick, MD, MS, FABM
June 9, 2020

As a hospitalist treating COVID-19 patients in the Boston area, a hot-spot, I seem to live in two conflicting worlds. At the peak of the epidemic, I would go to work and witness the sickness and death that COVID can bring. Then I would look on Facebook, and be met with angry voices writing from locales that have seen little of COVID. People were angry about wearing masks, about staying at home, about job losses. And as the pandemic has worn on, they have become angry about haircuts and all things re-opening. What messages have I told people and what messages have helped? Continue reading “Confronting COVID-19 and Social Media: A Hospitalist Speaks Out On Re-Opening”

Best Practices for Patient Engagement with Telehealth

Ted James, MD, MHCM
June 2, 2020

“In an age where the average consumer manages nearly all aspects of life online, it’s a no-brainer that healthcare should be just as convenient, accessible, and safe as online banking.”

— Jonathan Linkous, CEO of the American Telemedicine Association

Health care organizations are actively leveraging telemedicine as a natural solution to connecting with patients while addressing new social distancing realities. Honestly, I found it difficult at first to establish an effective rapport with patients using telehealth, especially for new patient consults. Many physicians report difficulty making the transition to virtual patient encounters.

The learning curve was more than I had expected, and my first few telehealth visits seemed disengaged and sterile. Not to mention having to deal with technical problems. In response, I looked for resources about making meaningful connections with patients, despite the loss of physical presence. I also looked at how to apply the basics of patient-centered communication to this new digital platform. As it turns out, you can learn techniques to become more comfortable and improve your ‘web-side manner.’ Continue reading “Best Practices for Patient Engagement with Telehealth”

The Role of Doctors in the COVID-19 “Infodemic”

By Dr. Marwa Saleh
May 19, 2020

In late March, several news outlets1,2 ran headlines stating that hundreds of Iranians died and others went blind after drinking adulterated alcohol for protection against COVID-19—some of them were children. On a similar note, the Journal of Histopathology documented the case3 of a 41-year-old American who was hospitalized after drinking disinfectant leading to the severe injury of her small bowels.

Other stories include  a father who died of COVID-19 after delaying medical help because he believed that COVID-19 was just like the flu, and the couple5 who ingested chloroquine (not intended for human use) leading to the death of the husband and hospitalization of the wife.

The tragic incidents were the result of misinformation and these consequences aren’t rare; A WHO report6 in February stated that we were facing a “massive infodemic.” The hazards of misinformation are vivid—misinformation costs lives. Continue reading “The Role of Doctors in the COVID-19 “Infodemic””

Dispelling Common Myths about Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy

By Sarah Bernstein, MD and Jessica Gray, MD
March 21, 2019

The opioid crisis and rise in overdose deaths in recent years has received a great deal of media attention. Though the media has helped to raise awareness, it has also contributed to stigmatization of individuals struggling with addiction. Pregnant and parenting women are among those who have been severely affected by the epidemic and perhaps most shamed by society for their use. Sadly, at a time when many women feel motivated to connect with the health care system and make healthy choices, women with addiction often avoid interacting with providers due to feelings of shame and mistrust. There are many misconceptions regarding the risks and benefits of medical treatment for women with substance use disorders as well as the treatment of neonatal withdrawal. We hope to dispel some of these myths and provide a better understanding of the evidence supporting the treatment of substance use disorders in the setting of pregnancy as well as neonatal withdrawal. Continue reading “Dispelling Common Myths about Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy”

Addressing the Urology Doctor Shortage: Implications For Patient Care

By Kevin R. Loughlin MD, MBA
February 14, 2018

Health care issues continue to receive extensive coverage in the lay press, however the current and future physician manpower issues which significantly impact patient care have been largely ignored. I would like to review the urologic workforce issues and their consequences. Continue reading “Addressing the Urology Doctor Shortage: Implications For Patient Care”

HMS Online CME Courses Approved for MAT Waiver Training

by The HMS CME Online Team
November 2018

NP and PA MAT Waiver Training

Through the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), nurse practitioners (NP) and physician assistants (PA) can become waivered to prescribe buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) after completing 24 hours of specialized training.

We are pleased to announce that The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has approved two of Harvard Medical School’s CME Online Opioid Use Disorder Education Program courses as fulfilling the 16-hour portion of the NP/PA 24-hour required training for waiver eligibility. These courses are: Continue reading “HMS Online CME Courses Approved for MAT Waiver Training”