Physicians as Advocates for Social Change

By Ted A. James, MD, MHCM
November 10, 2020

“Harnessing society’s full potential for optimizing health outcomes across the lifespan requires reaching out well beyond the health care system.”  – The National Academy of Medicine

I’ve heard the argument that physicians should not get involved in social or political issues; however, I must disagree. This realm is very much where we need to be. Physicians have dedicated themselves to helping people and relieving suffering. Standing up for issues that protect the wellbeing of the people in our communities is central to our role as physicians. Issues such as equality, social justice, human rights, safety, and access to care profoundly influence patient care. Continue reading “Physicians as Advocates for Social Change”

Diet Prescription and Eating Disorder Risk

By Jamie Marchetti, MS, RDN, LD, MA, PPC, NCC
October 28, 2020

For patients who present with what are typically considered weight-related disease states (diabetes, heart disease, or lower extremity joint pain), it is nearly second nature to recommend that clients “eat less and move more.” Conventional thinking and practice support this, and if this generalized directive doesn’t lead to weight loss and improvement of disease symptoms, the next steps typically include encouraging the patient to track their food and physical activity to report back to the physician. While this is a logical process within the framework of convention, there are a few reasons why it could become problematic. Continue reading “Diet Prescription and Eating Disorder Risk”

The 2 Essential Online Channels Physicians Can Use for Public Health Education and Advocacy

By Christopher Oseh
October 6, 2020

During the global lockdown period of the Coronavirus pandemic, I woke up on a Saturday morning to see this direct message on my Facebook messenger:

 “Hi Doc, please how do I know if I have contracted the Covid-19 virus”.

It was from one of my friends who had become anxious after reading false information online about the COVID-19 virus. She quickly reached out to me with this question because she knew I was active on Facebook. Continue reading “The 2 Essential Online Channels Physicians Can Use for Public Health Education and Advocacy”

Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice

A Webinar Series Offering Clinical Perspectives on Racial and Social Justice Issues

It’s no secret that racial and social disparities continue to affect the health of our communities across the United States. With increased attention resulting from the high-profile deaths of African Americans at the hands of law enforcement and the growing inequities stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, this weekly Harvard Medical School web series, Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice seeks to explore how race and racism affect the health of our communities. Continue reading “Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice”

Prescribing Size-Inclusive Home Fitness Routines in the Era of COVID-19

By Jamie Marchetti, MS, RDN, LD
September 17, 2020

In the time of COVID-19, routines have changed drastically and frequently. This has impacted many areas of the lives of Americans, including fitness routines. Gyms, if open, often have restrictions. So how can you best support your patients who need physical exercise? Continue reading “Prescribing Size-Inclusive Home Fitness Routines in the Era of COVID-19”

Do You Know When to Refer Your Patient to a Dietitian?

By Jamie Marchetti, MS, RDN, LD
August 12, 2020

During my tenure as a dietitian in a rural community hospital, I provided all the outpatient nutrition counseling for the facility. Sometimes patients sought out my guidance on their own, but most often, they were referred to me by a physician. While most referrals were made in a manner that was timely and appropriate for the diagnosis, some were not.

This post, therefore, is a dietitian’s perspective on best practices for physicians referring patients for nutrition care that can be delivered in a way that is helpful to support medical care. Continue reading “Do You Know When to Refer Your Patient to a Dietitian?”

How Physicians Can Prepare for Emerging Trends in Health Care Delivery

By Christopher Ugo Oseh, MBBS
July 23, 2020

This trend clearly indicates the need for physicians who are both clinically and technologically savvy to provide health care in the future.

Health care delivery services have been transformed by advances in health technology, and technology-based health care seems to be gaining ground. According to a McKinsey survey taken in April 2020, the adoption of telehealth services by United States citizens increased from 11% in 2019 to 46% in 2020. Although much of this accelerated adoption has been linked to restricted health care access caused by the coronavirus pandemic, experts are projecting a further increase in telehealth service adoption post-pandemic as many clients realize they prefer to access health care remotely rather than consulting in person with their doctors in a hospital. Continue reading “How Physicians Can Prepare for Emerging Trends in Health Care Delivery”

I Don’t Feel like a Hero: Imposter Syndrome and Perfectionism During a Pandemic

By Gail Gazelle, MD, MCC 
June 25, 2020

When Jeff left his ED shift at a New York City hospital in mid-April, he felt like anything but a hero. He’d intubated three COVID-19 patients: a 63-year-old businessman, an 82-year-old woman who reminded him of his grandmother, and a 45-year-old mother of two teens. The elderly woman and the businessman were transferred to the ICU. The mother of two teens was not; she expired in the ED.

By the end of his shift, Jeff felt a crushing weight of sadness and anguish unlike anything he’d experienced in his 15 years as an emergency physician—this shift was now his new norm. Continue reading “I Don’t Feel like a Hero: Imposter Syndrome and Perfectionism During a Pandemic”

Confronting COVID-19 and Social Media: A Hospitalist Speaks Out On Re-Opening

By Melissa Bartick, MD, MS, FABM
June 9, 2020

As a hospitalist treating COVID-19 patients in the Boston area, a hot-spot, I seem to live in two conflicting worlds. At the peak of the epidemic, I would go to work and witness the sickness and death that COVID can bring. Then I would look on Facebook, and be met with angry voices writing from locales that have seen little of COVID. People were angry about wearing masks, about staying at home, about job losses. And as the pandemic has worn on, they have become angry about haircuts and all things re-opening. What messages have I told people and what messages have helped? Continue reading “Confronting COVID-19 and Social Media: A Hospitalist Speaks Out On Re-Opening”