Addressing the Urology Doctor Shortage: Implications For Patient Care

By Kevin R. Loughlin MD, MBA
February 14, 2018

Health care issues continue to receive extensive coverage in the lay press, however the current and future physician manpower issues which significantly impact patient care have been largely ignored. I would like to review the urologic workforce issues and their consequences. Continue reading “Addressing the Urology Doctor Shortage: Implications For Patient Care”

Why Physician Leaders Can No Longer Ignore Health Policy

By John E. McDonough
January 24, 2019

For most physicians and physician leaders, health policy is an annoyance and distraction that happens “over there” in Washington DC, state capitals, and elsewhere.  The ways and means of politics and policy making are mysterious and not worth the bother.

In today’s U.S. health care system, that attitude makes less and less sense from institutional, professional, and personal points of view. Continue reading “Why Physician Leaders Can No Longer Ignore Health Policy”

Time Management for Physician Leaders—Accomplish More of Your Goals

By Ted A James, MD, MHCM
January 10, 2018

“Until we can manage time, we can manage nothing else“
Peter F. Drucker

Physicians have a crucial role to play leading health care transformation. The problem is that there is no end to competing interests vying for our time. Most of us respond to increasing demands by putting in longer hours—which inevitably takes a toll on our physical, mental, and emotional well-being. Soon, all of our time becomes consumed by busywork, and we miss opportunities to realize our vision and make a lasting and meaningful impact as leaders. This ultimately leads to frustration and a lack of fulfillment. Fortunately, steps can be taken to be more effective with time: Continue reading “Time Management for Physician Leaders—Accomplish More of Your Goals”

Caring for Patients Using Sign Language: The ADA Legacy of George H.W. Bush

By Ami Bhatt, MD, FACC
December 6, 2018

On July 26, 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA was touted for promoting health as well as civil rights.

I learned first-hand about the experience of patients with disabilities by caring for patients with concomitant congenital deafness and congenital heart disease. I am fortunate to have cared for a cadre of these patients with a dedicated sign language interpreter over the past decade. She represented me to the patients and the patients to me. Importantly, in addition to translating language, she expressed the tone of voice and achieved the delivery of emotions which are essential to effective and compassionate communication. She was also a trusted partner in my practice of medicine. Since she also knew my patients’ histories, I could trust her to accompany the patient at other doctors’ visits, to help the patient communicate what I had shared, and vice versa. Continue reading “Caring for Patients Using Sign Language: The ADA Legacy of George H.W. Bush”

The Science of Health Care Improvement: Overcoming Unintended Variation

By Ted James
November 29, 2018

“Uncontrolled variation is the enemy of quality.”
– Edwards Deming

Widespread variations in clinical practice that cannot be explained by differences in medical condition or patient preference are routinely observed across multiple specialties and clinical settings. The problem with unexplained variation in health care is that it negatively impacts clinical outcomes, increases the cost of care, and diminishes value for our patients. Continue reading “The Science of Health Care Improvement: Overcoming Unintended Variation”

Optimizing Motivation Theory for Medical Training: Teaching on the Wards

By Eric Gantwerker MD, MMSc (MedEd), FACS
November 15, 2018

As we take theory to practice we discuss what motivates our trainees to learn and how can we use motivational learning theory to promote deep and meaningful learning among our trainees.

Self-determination theory (SDT) purports that humans are by nature curious and have the desire to learn.1,2 SDT underlies the concept of motivation; described as a continuum from amotivation (lack of motivation) to extrinsic motivation (external rewards) to intrinsic motivation (inherent interest).3 A closely related concept is self-regulated learning (SRL), described by Zimmerman et al., that delineates the complex interplay between motivations, learning, assessment, and metacognition that impacts effective learning processes.4,5

Intrinsic motivation and SRL have been associated with deeper forms of learning, improved performance, increased interest, commitment, and satisfaction.2,3 As we take theory to practice we discuss what motivates our trainees to learn and how can we use motivational learning theory to promote deep and meaningful learning among our trainees. Strategies to foster intrinsic motivation and SRL have been tied to three basic psychological needs: autonomy, competence, and relatedness.1,2 In addition, some common practices are discussed regarding their impact on motivation and SRL. Continue reading “Optimizing Motivation Theory for Medical Training: Teaching on the Wards”

HMS Online CME Courses Approved for MAT Waiver Training

by The HMS CME Online Team
November 2018

NP and PA MAT Waiver Training

Through the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), nurse practitioners (NP) and physician assistants (PA) can become waivered to prescribe buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) after completing 24 hours of specialized training.

We are pleased to announce that The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has approved two of Harvard Medical School’s CME Online Opioid Use Disorder Education Program courses as fulfilling the 16-hour portion of the NP/PA 24-hour required training for waiver eligibility. These courses are: Continue reading “HMS Online CME Courses Approved for MAT Waiver Training”