Does Shift Work Affect our Metabolism?

By Ana Luiza Dias, P.h.D
February 25, 2021

We live in a 24-hour society. Especially in big cities, we can find all kinds of services available at any time of the day, from restaurants to pharmacies and supermarkets. Airports do not stop at night, nor do other transport services. Hospitals also operate throughout the night because there is no right time to get sick.

The public expects healthcare professionals to be available when needed. This has become more evident with the COVID-19 pandemic as we have seen how much society depends on healthcare workers to function at their full capacity. But does being awake while everyone else sleeps have consequences on our health and well-being? Continue reading “Does Shift Work Affect our Metabolism?”

Essential Nutrients and their Impact on Patients’ Moods

By Akanksha Srivastava, M.Sc.
February 10, 2021

Did you know that the lack of specific vitamins and minerals can cause stress, depressed mood, and anxiety? Unhealthy diets and poor mental health are linked to mortality and morbidity worldwide. The challenge is that little information is available for health practitioners to guide evidence-based recommendations for nutrition interventions to manage anxiety and mood disorders. Continue reading “Essential Nutrients and their Impact on Patients’ Moods”

Teprotumumab: How Effective Is the First Drug Approved for Thyroid Eye Disease?

[This post was originally published on the Harvard Medical School Trends in Medicine blog and has been republished here with permission.]

By Rohit Jain, B. Pharmacy, MBA, PGDBM, LL.B, DCR
November 24, 2020

Thyroid eye disease (TED) is also termed as ophthalmopathy or Grave’s orbitopathy. TED is an autoimmune condition whereby the lacrimal glands, eyelids, and periorbital muscles become inflamed. The condition is present in almost 2% of patients with thyroiditis and 25–50% of patients suffering from Grave’s Disease. Approximately 80–90% of patients with thyroid eye disease have hyperthyroidism while the rest have hypothyroidism or euthyroidism. TED leads to a constellation of symptoms and signs including conjunctival injection, lid retraction, periorbital edema, and the characteristic appearance of exophthalmos. Severe exophthalmos can cause incomplete eyelid closure with corneal exposure, resulting in dryness, and abrasions. In advanced cases of TED, enlargement of periorbital tissues may compress the optic nerve leading to partial or complete vision loss. Continue reading “Teprotumumab: How Effective Is the First Drug Approved for Thyroid Eye Disease?”

Strengthening Physicians’ Growth Mindset to Promote a Culture of Cooperation

By Rose Scaringella-Cappelli
January 12, 2021

Although 2020 was a year filled with many stressful uncertainties, healthcare workers came together to do everything possible to provide innovative care, accelerated COVID research, and advanced new technologies necessary to meet the challenges we faced. Uniting and rising to the challenges of the pandemic and the social inequities have allowed all of us to examine our role in promoting a culture of cooperation and collegiality in the workplace. This makes 2021 the perfect year to re-imagine our work environment, behaviors, and processes; it’s time to make changes that will strengthen our culture of fairness, inclusion, and belonging while letting go of disruptive behaviors that can negatively affect the workplace. Continue reading “Strengthening Physicians’ Growth Mindset to Promote a Culture of Cooperation”

The Benefits of Multimedia Digital Learning for Continuing Medical Education

By Christopher Ugo Oseh, MBBS
December 22, 2020

Health care professionals, especially physicians, rely on continuing medical education to upgrade their knowledge and skills and stay current with advancements in their medical practice. Recent developments in internet technology and social media platforms, combined with the need for social social distancing due to the Covid-19 pandemic, are accelerating the evolution from traditional medical classrooms and conferences to digital education. Medical educators will soon find it imperative to adapt their curriculum and educational content to attract a new generation of digital learners.

This post will outline some benefits and features that make digital media like Twitter and podcasts suitable for medical education. Continue reading “The Benefits of Multimedia Digital Learning for Continuing Medical Education”

Discussing The Racist Patient: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice

Diane Thomas, Managing Editor
December 1, 2020

This past July, Harvard Medical School’s Postgraduate Medical Education team (PGME) launched a webinar series titled: Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice, which seeks to explore how race and racism affect the health of our communities. The following post is an excerpt from a session in which Dr. Sachin H. Jain discusses his paper “The Racist Patient” in the Annals of Internal Medicine with Dr. Kevin Tucker, faculty director of Accredited Programs for PGME: Continue reading “Discussing The Racist Patient: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice”

Physicians as Advocates for Social Change

By Ted A. James, MD, MHCM
November 10, 2020

“Harnessing society’s full potential for optimizing health outcomes across the lifespan requires reaching out well beyond the health care system.”  – The National Academy of Medicine

I’ve heard the argument that physicians should not get involved in social or political issues; however, I must disagree. This realm is very much where we need to be. Physicians have dedicated themselves to helping people and relieving suffering. Standing up for issues that protect the wellbeing of the people in our communities is central to our role as physicians. Issues such as equality, social justice, human rights, safety, and access to care profoundly influence patient care. Continue reading “Physicians as Advocates for Social Change”

Diet Prescription and Eating Disorder Risk

By Jamie Marchetti, MS, RDN, LD, MA, PPC, NCC
October 28, 2020

For patients who present with what are typically considered weight-related disease states (diabetes, heart disease, or lower extremity joint pain), it is nearly second nature to recommend that clients “eat less and move more.” Conventional thinking and practice support this, and if this generalized directive doesn’t lead to weight loss and improvement of disease symptoms, the next steps typically include encouraging the patient to track their food and physical activity to report back to the physician. While this is a logical process within the framework of convention, there are a few reasons why it could become problematic. Continue reading “Diet Prescription and Eating Disorder Risk”

The 2 Essential Online Channels Physicians Can Use for Public Health Education and Advocacy

By Christopher Oseh
October 6, 2020

During the global lockdown period of the Coronavirus pandemic, I woke up on a Saturday morning to see this direct message on my Facebook messenger:

 “Hi Doc, please how do I know if I have contracted the Covid-19 virus”.

It was from one of my friends who had become anxious after reading false information online about the COVID-19 virus. She quickly reached out to me with this question because she knew I was active on Facebook. Continue reading “The 2 Essential Online Channels Physicians Can Use for Public Health Education and Advocacy”

Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice

A Webinar Series Offering Clinical Perspectives on Racial and Social Justice Issues

It’s no secret that racial and social disparities continue to affect the health of our communities across the United States. With increased attention resulting from the high-profile deaths of African Americans at the hands of law enforcement and the growing inequities stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, this weekly Harvard Medical School web series, Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice seeks to explore how race and racism affect the health of our communities. Continue reading “Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice”