Best Practices for Patient Engagement with Telehealth

Ted James, MD, MHCM
June 2, 2020

“In an age where the average consumer manages nearly all aspects of life online, it’s a no-brainer that healthcare should be just as convenient, accessible, and safe as online banking.”

— Jonathan Linkous, CEO of the American Telemedicine Association

Health care organizations are actively leveraging telemedicine as a natural solution to connecting with patients while addressing new social distancing realities. Honestly, I found it difficult at first to establish an effective rapport with patients using telehealth, especially for new patient consults. Many physicians report difficulty making the transition to virtual patient encounters.

The learning curve was more than I had expected, and my first few telehealth visits seemed disengaged and sterile. Not to mention having to deal with technical problems. In response, I looked for resources about making meaningful connections with patients, despite the loss of physical presence. I also looked at how to apply the basics of patient-centered communication to this new digital platform. As it turns out, you can learn techniques to become more comfortable and improve your ‘web-side manner.’ Continue reading “Best Practices for Patient Engagement with Telehealth”

COVID-19: Quarantine Tips from a Dietitian

By Jamie M. Marchetti, MS, RDN, LD
March 20, 2020

As grocery store options grow sparse and many face the possibility of being quarantined to their homes in the wake of COVID-19, neither you nor your patients may be able to eat the way you normally do. As your typical foods may be unavailable or perishable, consider these tips when choosing new options from the grocery store, and share this information with your patients as well. Continue reading “COVID-19: Quarantine Tips from a Dietitian”

The Role for Health Coaching in Primary Care

By Monique Tello, MD, MPH
July 25, 2019

It’s remarkable to me that while overweight and obesity are major epidemic medical problems resulting in many clinical complications, and we have solid scientific evidence showing us safe, effective interventions that actually help people to lose weight, we are not yet incorporating these methods into primary care. What’s our problem?

Want to know more about what works for weight loss? I’ll tell you: behavioral change support, in the form of a health coach. Continue reading “The Role for Health Coaching in Primary Care”

Dispelling Common Myths about Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy

By Sarah Bernstein, MD and Jessica Gray, MD
March 21, 2019

The opioid crisis and rise in overdose deaths in recent years has received a great deal of media attention. Though the media has helped to raise awareness, it has also contributed to stigmatization of individuals struggling with addiction. Pregnant and parenting women are among those who have been severely affected by the epidemic and perhaps most shamed by society for their use. Sadly, at a time when many women feel motivated to connect with the health care system and make healthy choices, women with addiction often avoid interacting with providers due to feelings of shame and mistrust. There are many misconceptions regarding the risks and benefits of medical treatment for women with substance use disorders as well as the treatment of neonatal withdrawal. We hope to dispel some of these myths and provide a better understanding of the evidence supporting the treatment of substance use disorders in the setting of pregnancy as well as neonatal withdrawal. Continue reading “Dispelling Common Myths about Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy”

Promoting and Implementing Size Inclusivity in Health Care

By Jamie M. Marchetti, MS, RDN, LD
March 14, 2019

Beth was obese. She had been bigger her whole life, so this was not news as she reached her late-twenties. Beth ( her name has been changed to protect her privacy) was getting married and ready to start a family, so she went to her obstetrician/gynecologist to have her intrauterine device (IUD) removed and to discuss the implications of her polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) on fertility. The doctor scoffed and stated, “I don’t know how we’re going to get it out. At your size, I’m not even sure how they managed to get the IUD into you.” Further, it was discovered that Beth had grapefruit-sized cysts on both ovaries, and the doctor told her that neither he nor any doctor would do surgery to remove the cysts given her body size. Beth was desperate, so through her hurt and anger, she chose a crash diet to follow, which resulted in acute renal failure within weeks. Heartbroken and at the end of her rope, Beth found herself crying in a dietitian’s office, convinced that the well-balanced diet she was already eating must be harming her since doctors insisted she must not be nourishing herself properly if she wasn’t losing weight. Beth explained that she was content with her body, but that she was tired of seeking medical care and being treated poorly because of her size. Continue reading “Promoting and Implementing Size Inclusivity in Health Care”

Addressing the Urology Doctor Shortage: Implications For Patient Care

By Kevin R. Loughlin MD, MBA
February 14, 2018

Health care issues continue to receive extensive coverage in the lay press, however the current and future physician manpower issues which significantly impact patient care have been largely ignored. I would like to review the urologic workforce issues and their consequences. Continue reading “Addressing the Urology Doctor Shortage: Implications For Patient Care”