Ending America’s Gun Violence

Grieving widow and teenage daughter accompanying casket in hearse.

By Ajay K. Singh, MBBS, FRCP, MBA
November 7, 2017

…it is imperative, now more than ever, that we approach this public health concern in an evidence-based and apolitical manner so as to better understand the complex social, economic, and political factors associated with firearm-related injuries. – Faiz Gani

Gun violence is a leading cause of premature death in the US, killing approximately 30,000 people and causing about 60,000 injuries each year.

In the midst of writing an article about a blog post on gun violence by Faiz Gani, I heard breaking news about 26 people tragically killed in a Texas church.

Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn) issued a statement after the Texas church mass shooting: “As my colleagues go to sleep tonight, they need to think about whether the political support of the gun industry is worth the blood that flows endlessly onto the floors of American churches, elementary schools, movie theaters, and city streets. Ask yourself—how can you claim that you respect human life while choosing fealty to weapons-makers over support for measures favored by the vast majority of your constituents.”

While the motive for the Texas mass shooting (or for that matter, the tragic mass shooting in Las Vegas) remains elusive, one factor that has been common among some earlier mass shootings is that the perpetrator(s) suffered from mental illness.

Besides the mental instability part of the problem, there is also the economic cost. The post by Faiz Gani in Health Affairs discusses the price of gun violence:

Thousands of individuals incur firearm-related injuries daily, leading to approximately 36,000 deaths each year from a firearm-related injury. The number of nonfatal injuries is estimated to be three times that number…we estimate that the annual financial burden associated with the ED and inpatient care for firearm-related injuries to be $2.8 billion in hospital charges. Taking into account the costs of rehabilitation, repeat admissions, and lost work, the CDC estimates that each year, approximately $46 billion are lost due to firearm-related injuries. This figure is comparable to the $49 billion spent to treat patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the third leading cause of death in the United States…it is imperative, now more than ever, that we approach this public health concern in an evidence-based and apolitical manner so as to better understand the complex social, economic, and political factors associated with firearm-related injuries.

Setting aside constitutional right issues around gun ownership and the huge and tragic human cost of gun violence, there is the economic cost. Isn’t it worth asking if better access to mental health services to perpetrator(s) would reduce the current rate and extent of mass shootings?

Gani’s post suggests that from a purely economic perspective, the government investing in more mental illness treatment (programs and facilities) might make the difference. Even if mental illness is not formally diagnosed, most of us would agree that this type of mindless, despicable violence has a component of mental instability.

Share your thoughts with Harvard Medical School in the comment section below.

Ajay Singh, MBBS, FRCP headshotDr. Ajay K. Singh is the Senior Associate Dean for Global and Continuing Education and Director, Master in Medical Sciences in Clinical Investigation (MMSCI) Program at Harvard Medical School. He is also Director, Continuing Medical Education, Department of Medicine and Renal Division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

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